>
carolynmarshall sent: I love your blog!! your designs are so beautiful and inspiring. you are so talented. :)

Thanks! The majority of posts here though are credited to other artists. :) You can find my personal work on my flickr link.

totalfilm:

 The Week’s Best Movie Virals, Memes & Gifs

totalfilm:

The Week’s Best Movie Virals, Memes & Gifs

scottlava:

“When we die, our bodies become the grass, and the antelope eat the grass. And so we are all connnected in the great Circle of Life.”
The Great Showdowns in book form!

scottlava:

When we die, our bodies become the grass, and the antelope eat the grass. And so we are all connnected in the great Circle of Life.

The Great Showdowns in book form!

mpdrolet:

Olya Ivanova

mpdrolet:

Olya Ivanova

farewell-kingdom:

Mimoe

mpdrolet:

Brandon Long

mpdrolet:

Brandon Long

mrelbank:

#2
Joseph 
Kimono…

mrelbank:

#2

Joseph

Kimono…

cavetocanvas:

Franz Xavier Winterhalter, The Empress Eugénie, 1854
From the Metropolitan Museum of Art:

Winterhalter began an official portrait of Empress Eugénie (Eugénie de Montijo, Condesa de Teba, 1826-1920) shortly after her marriage in 1853 to Napoleon III, emperor of France, but it was not exhibited until 1855. The present work is, in contrast, relatively intimate in scale and effect. It shows the empress in a Second Empire adaptation of an eighteenth-century gown. Her interest in the previous century, especially her fascination with Marie Antoinette, queen of France from 1774 to 1793, is well documented.

cavetocanvas:

Franz Xavier Winterhalter, The Empress Eugénie, 1854

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art:

Winterhalter began an official portrait of Empress Eugénie (Eugénie de Montijo, Condesa de Teba, 1826-1920) shortly after her marriage in 1853 to Napoleon III, emperor of France, but it was not exhibited until 1855. The present work is, in contrast, relatively intimate in scale and effect. It shows the empress in a Second Empire adaptation of an eighteenth-century gown. Her interest in the previous century, especially her fascination with Marie Antoinette, queen of France from 1774 to 1793, is well documented.

chechitout:

(new work in progress)

So, I’m getting ready for my “PERSPECTIVE” show, and I wanted to try something I’ve never done before. I wanted to take the same style and method I use for my small illustrations and blow it up. This is step two of my test canvas, time to add the background!

sosuperawesome:

Kevin Russ, Traveling And Paying The Bills With iPhoneography

A couple years ago I discovered Kevin Russ on Flickr. I love his portrait work and his use of natural light. I hadn’t seen much from him on Flickr in a while and just the other day I found out why. Kevin has been traveling the United States, shooting landscape photography with just his iPhone, and living off the print sales.

I must admit I am jealous of Kevin’s current life. He hops in his car, looks at a map of places he wants to go in this country, and takes off. When he gets there he photographs what he sees, predominantly landscapes and nature, and most of which he shoots on his iPhone. He is a contributor to iStockphoto as well as sells his prints on his Society 6 page. Check out his work, in my opinion it is absolutely beautiful. He also has a new flickr for his mobile photos, check it out! I think his work is a prime example of the fact that it isn’t about the camera, it’s about the photographer.

tfail:

Anyone in Los Angeles have a wall they want painted this weekend? Haunted Euth and I need some more walls to paint. Shoot me an email if interested tfailmakesart@gmail.com

tfail:

Anyone in Los Angeles have a wall they want painted this weekend?
Haunted Euth and I need some more walls to paint. Shoot me an email if interested tfailmakesart@gmail.com

arcaneimages:














Dave Wachter

arcaneimages:

typeverything:

Typeverything.com - Rachel Ray Mag by Erik Marinovich (via Friends of Type)

typeverything:

Typeverything.com - Rachel Ray Mag by Erik Marinovich (via Friends of Type)

arpeggia:

Violinist Jascha Heifetz playing in Mili’s darkened studio as light attached to his bow traces the bow movement.

Photo by Gjon Mili, 1952 - LIFE archive

More posts